Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.  — Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), Italian artist, architect &  engineer whose genius epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal

I finally bought a new camera.  Nothing fancy, just an unsexy Samsung PL120.  It takes great pictures, is reasonably priced, has fun features (see picture above!) and is nicely intuitive to use.

Normally, my savvy husband does all the research for our electronics shopping adventures.  This time, however,  I had decided, since I’m the techie idiot, who better to do the idiot testing?  My method was simple.  I went to Target and played with the cameras in the $150 range.  My idea of playing with electronics is disqualifying anything I can’t reasonably navigate within a minute.  Zero.  Patience.

Once I disqualified all but the Samsung, I did a quick research from my phone to see what others had to say.  I smiled.  I’m not the only idiot out here who appreciates simplicity.

I also appreciate the countless generations who came before me, those who made my camera buying experience possible.

It’s partly sentimental, because my dear dad was a techie in the Associated Press back in the 60’s and 70’s.  His huge, company-issued station wagons were only big enough to hold ONE computer.  He died at 38 and we often think of the immense joy he would have found at being on this earth in these days of amazing technology.

But there’s something else.  I have come to believe simplicity and technology are about much more than electronics and other cool stuff.  It’s about Project Humanity’s collective and progressive discovery of God, who built the universe upon the foundation of  witty mathematics.  Think of snapping your pictures and putting them on Facebook.  How could you possibly explain this to someone living in biblical times?  Or maybe you could show them?  Might they insist it was the work of God who put those glowing images in strange boxes all over the world?  Well . . . they’d be right.  Doesn’t the discovery of cameras, computers, the Internet–even our brains that figured out the cameras, computers, the Internet–hinge on thousands of years of collective mathematical discovery?  God is love but he talks in numbers.

I love that God says he is light.  In the story of Noah’s Ark, he gives us a rainbow to show his promise of love.  I’m guessing back in those days, people had no idea a rainbow was literally the revelation of light.   I think God was giving us more than a promise.  He was giving us a clue.

Maybe you’re not into techie stuff?  Maybe you just want to bask in the simplicity of nature?  Okay.  Sit under the trees.  Gaze at the stars.  Have zero patience for anything other than their beauty.  But don’t be fooled.  It’s thanks to God Technology that they are nicely intuitive to use.

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